Types of Survey Questions to Ask: 50 Survey Question Examples [2019] Survey questions 101: 50+ survey question examples, different types of surveys, and FAQs

December 19, 2018 by Louis Grenier

How well do you understand your prospects and customers? Do you know who they are, what keeps them awake at night, and what brought them to your website in search of a solution?

If you don’t understand your users, you won’t be able to maximize conversions. And you won’t be able to understand them unless you ask the right survey questions at the right point in their buyer’s journey.

This blog post will teach you how to write good survey questions, and it includes over 50 examples of effective survey questions for e-commerce, Software/Software as a Service (SaaS), and publishers/bloggers.

Table of contents

What is a good survey question?

A good survey question helps you get clear insights and business-critical information about your customers, helping you understand things like:

  • Who your target market is
  • How you should price your products
  • Why visitors leave your website

By asking effective survey questions, you’ll get quality answers and data you can tie to the customer behavior captured in analytics tools like Heatmaps and Session Recordings. This is powerful information you can combine: analytics tools will tell you what is happening on the page; the written replies to your survey questions will tell you why it's happening. 

Why is it important to ask good survey questions?

You’re only as good as your data… and good data starts with good survey questions. A good survey question is asked in a precise way at the right stage in the buyer’s journey to give you solid data about your customers’ needs and drives.

With this information, you can then tailor your website, products, landing pages, and messaging to improve the user experience and (ultimately) maximize conversions.

What happens if you don’t ask the right questions, or you word them wrongly and/or ask them at the wrong time? You could waste countless hours trying to fix minimal problems while ignoring the real ones.

“Overall, if you want to deliver an AMAZING customer experience, the SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT thing you can do is LEARN more about your customers so you can custom tailor that experience to them. It's not magic. It's not science. It is simply building a tighter relationship with your customer.”

 

Eric Carlson - Founder, 10XFactory

 

Send a survey today 🔥

Grab a free Hotjar trial and set your first survey today on your website or via email to understand your customers and grow your business.

Free forever. Get started!
 ScrollCTA

6Types of survey questions

Before we dive into how to write a good question, let me give you a quick summary and examples of the different survey question types you can ask.

1.Open-ended questions

Open-ended - types of survey questions

Open-ended questions give the respondent the freedom to write whatever they like, unlike closed-ended questions which limit their response to a set of pre-selected choices (such as multiple-choice answers, yes/no answers, 0-10 ratings, etc.). 

Examples

What other products would you like to see us offer?

If you could change just one thing about our product, what would it be?

When to use open-ended questions

You’ll notice that the vast majority of the sample questions included in this post are open-ended, and there’s a very good reason for that. Open-ended questions help you learn about customer needs you didn’t know existed, and they shine a light on areas for improvement that will probably surprise you.

In short, if you limit your respondents’ answers, you’ll cut yourself off from some key insights. And open-ended questions are an absolute must when you first begin collecting feedback and you know next to nothing about your users.

There are, however, a few downsides to open-ended questions.

First, users tend to be less likely to respond to open-ended questions in general because they take comparatively more effort to answer than, say, a yes/no one.

Second, but connected: if you ask multiple open-ended questions in a row, people get tired of answering them, and their answers will become less and less helpful the more you ask.

Finally, the data you receive from open-ended questions will take longer to analyze… but don’t let that stop you! There are plenty of shortcuts that make it easier than it looks, and we explain it all in our post about analyzing open-ended questions.

2. Closed-ended questions

 

Closed-end questions limit a user’s response options to a set of pre-selected choices. This broad category of questions includes:

  • Nominal questions
  • Likert scale questions
  • Rating scale questions
  • ‘Yes’ or ‘no’ questions

I’ll describe each in greater detail below.

Closed-ended questions work very well to begin surveys, because they’re easy for customers to answer. This is called the foot-in-the-door principle—once a user commits to answering the first question, they’re more likely to answer the open-ended questions that follow.

Another great thing about closed-ended questions is that the results are easy to tabulate and use as benchmarks; rating scale questions in particular (e.g., where you get people to rate customer service or website usability on a scale of 1-10—more on this below) allow you to gather customer sentiment and compare your progress over time.

3. Nominal questions

Nominal - types of survey questions

A nominal question is a multiple-choice question that identifies different categories of answers. The answers don’t overlap (unless you include an ‘all of the above’ option), and you can’t apply a numerical value to them.

Examples

What are you using [product name] for?

  1. Business
  2. Personal use
  3. Both business and personal use

Which browser are you using?

  1. Chrome
  2. Safari
  3. Firefox
  4. Explorer
  5. Other (allows open-ended, write-in response)

When to use nominal questions

Nominal questions work well when there is a limited number of categories for a given question (see the first example above). They’re easy for users to answer and for you to tabulate, but you shouldn’t use them until you know enough about your customers—you risk missing out on important categories you had not considered.

You can always add an open-ended component to a nominal question with an expandable ’Other’ category, which allows respondents to write in an answer that isn’t on the list. When you do that, you’re essentially asking an open-ended question because you aren’t limiting them to the options you’ve provided.

4.Likert scale questions

Likert scale range

The Likert scale is a 5- or 7- point scale that helps evaluate how respondents feel about something. The lowest number (always a ‘1’) indicates one extreme view, while the highest number (e.g., a ’5’ on a 5-point scale) indicates the opposite extreme view. The median number (e.g., a ‘3’ on a 5-point scale) indicates a middle-of-the-road view.

Examples

How strongly do you agree with the following statement: [company’s] payment process is simple and painless.

1 - Strongly disagree
2 - Somewhat disagree
3 - Neither agree nor disagree
4 - Somewhat agree
5 - Strongly agree

How satisfied were you with your customer service experience?

1 - Very dissatisfied
2 - Somewhat dissatisfied
3 - Slightly dissatisfied
4 - Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
5 - Slightly satisfied
6 - Somewhat satisfied
7 - Very satisfied

When to use Likert scale questions

Like other multiple-choice questions, Likert scale questions come in handy when you already have some sense of what your customers are thinking. For example, if your open-ended questions uncover a complaint about a recent change to your ordering process, you could use a Likert scale question to determine how the average user felt about the change.

5.Ordinal questions (also called rating scale questions)

Ordinal - types of survey questions

Ordinal questions have a range of multiple-choice answers that map onto a numeric scale (such as rating customer support on a scale of 1-5, or likelihood to recommend a product from 0 to 10).

Example

How likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague on a scale of 0-10?

How would you rate our customer service on a scale of 1-5?

When to use ordinal questions

A typical ordinal question is used to determine Net Promoter Score (NPS), which tells you how likely customers are to recommend your products or services to their friends or colleagues. Ordinal questions are also used for customer satisfaction surveys and product reviews (such as Amazon’s five-star product ratings).

Important: when you use an ordinal question in a survey, be sure to explain what the scale means (e.g., ‘1’ for ‘Poor’, 5 for ‘Amazing’).

6.‘Yes’ or ‘no’ questions

yes or no - types of survey questions

These questions are super-straightforward: they require a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’ reply.

Examples

Was this article useful? (Yes/No)

Did you find what you were looking for today? (Yes/No)

When to use ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions

‘Yes’ and ‘no’ questions are a good way to quickly segment your respondents. For example, say you only want to poll people who work in accounting departments for a specific survey. You can ask, ‘Are you an accounting professional?’ If they answer ‘no,’ then you don’t need to proceed with that survey.

These questions are also great for getting your foot in the door. When you ask a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ question, it requires very little effort to answer. Once a user commits to answering the first question, they tend to become more willing to answer the questions that follow.

“Understand your customers’ pain points and then establish processes to reduce customer effort. The reason I am saying this is that customer pain points differ from one industry to another and even from one company to another.

Check the consumer complaints section of your website and identify the most common problems faced by customers. Read customer reviews on your website or on third-party websites to understand what customers say about your brand. Conduct a survey of your customers to identify the key aspects that you can improve to provide a better customer experience.”

 

Shane Barker - Digital Strategist, ShaneBarker.com

How to write good (and effective) survey questions: the DOs and DON’Ts

To help you understand the basics and avoid some rookie mistakes, we asked a few experts to give us their thoughts on what makes a good and effective survey question.

Survey question DOs

DO focus your questions on the customer

Focus your survey questions on the customer

It may be tempting to focus on your company or products, but it is usually more effective to put the focus back on the customer. Get to know their needs, drives, pain points, and barriers to purchase by asking about their experience. That’s what you’re after: you want to know what it’s like inside their heads and how they feel when they use your website and products.

“Rather than asking: ‘Why did you buy our product?’ ask ‘What was happening in your life that led you to search for this solution?’

Instead of asking: ‘What's the one feature you love about [product],’ I ask: ‘If our company were to close tomorrow, what would be the one thing you’d miss the most?’ These types of surveys have helped me double and triple my clients.”

  

Talia Wolf - Founder and Chief Optimizer at GetUplift

DO be polite and concise (without skimping on micro-copy)

Be polite and concise in your survey questions

Put time into your micro-copy—those tiny bits of written content that go into surveys. Explain why you’re asking the questions, and when people reach the end of the survey, remember to thank them for their time. After all, they’re giving you free labor!

“You are asking your audience to take time out of their day to do free work for you, so you need to be warm, personable, and even a little charming to get them to want to help you.”

 

Momoko Price - Conversion Copywriter at Kantan

DO consider the foot-in-the-door principle

Consider foot-in-the-door in your survey questions

One way to increase your response rate is to ask an easy question up front, such as a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ question, because once people commit to taking a survey, they’re more likely to finish it. 

“The foot-in-the-door principle helps you create a first point of contact with a person, laying the groundwork for the rest of your survey. Start with a small question, and build up from there. But be respectful: don’t use this principle to manipulate your users into doing something they didn’t want to do; and once they commit to helping you, don’t take advantage of their time.”

 

fio

 

 

Fio Dossetto - Content Marketer at Hotjar

DO consider asking your questions from the first-person perspective

Okay, so we don’t do this here at Hotjar. You’ll notice all our sample questions are listed in second-person (i.e., ‘you’ format), but it’s worth testing to determine which approach gives you better answers. Some experts prefer the first-person approach (i.e., ‘I’ format) because they believe it encourages users to talk about themselves—but only you can decide which approach works best for your business.

“I strongly recommend that the questions be worded in the first person. This helps create a more visceral reaction from people and encourages them to tell stories from their actual experiences, rather than making up hypothetical scenarios.

For example, here’s a similar question, asked two ways:

Version 1: ‘What do you think is the hardest thing about creating a UX portfolio?’

Version 2: ‘My biggest problem with creating my UX portfolio is …’

The second version helps get people thinking about their experiences. The best survey responses come from respondents who provide personal accounts of past events that give us specific and real insight into their lives."

 

Sarah Doody - UX Designer, SarahDoody.com

DO alternate your questions often

Shake up the questions you ask on a regular basis. Asking a wide variety of questions will help you and your team get a complete view of what your customers are thinking.

“Having run thousands of user research projects, I have found that the key is to alternate questions often. You want your team to be reading a wide variety of answers so they can truly empathize with their users.”

 

david-1

 

 

David Darmanin - CEO at Hotjar

DO test your surveys before sending them out

Test your survey questions

Hotjar recently created a survey that we sent to 2,000 CX professionals via email. Before officially sending it out, we wanted to make sure the questions really worked. 

We decided to test them out on internal staff and external people by sending out three rounds of test surveys to 100 respondents each time. Their feedback helped us perfect the questions and clear up any confusing language.

Survey question DON’Ts 

DON’T ask closed-ended questions if you’ve never done research before

If you’ve just begun asking questions, make them open-ended questions since you have no idea what your customers think about you at this stage. When you limit their answers, you just reinforce your own assumptions.

There are two exceptions to this rule: 1) using a closed-ended question to get your foot in the door at the beginning of a survey, and 2) using rating scale questions to gather customer sentiment (like an NPS survey).

DON’T ask a lot of questions if you’re just getting started

Having to answer too many questions can overwhelm your users. You really have to make peace with the fact you can’t ask as many questions as you’d like, so stick with the most important things and discard the rest.

Try starting off with a single question to see how your audience responds, then move on to two questions once you feel like you know what you’re doing.

How many questions should you ask? There’s really no perfect answer, but we recommend asking as few as you need to ask in order to get the information you want. In the beginning, focus on the big things:

  • Who are your users?
  • What do potential customers want?
  • How are they using your product?
  • What would win their loyalty?

DON’T ask a question that could be answered better using other tools

Don’t use surveys to answer questions that other tools (such as analytics) are better equipped to answer. If you want to learn about whether people find a new website feature helpful, you can observe how they’re using it through analytics, session recordings, and user testing.

“Don’t use surveys to ask people questions that other tools are better equipped to answer.

I’m thinking of questions like ‘What do you think of the search feature?’ with pre-set answer options like ‘Very easy to use,’ ‘Easy to use,’ etc. That’s not a good question to ask. Why should you care about what people ‘think’ about the search feature? You should find out whether it helps people find what they need and whether it helps drive conversions for you. Analytics, user session recordings, and user testing can tell you whether it does that or not."

  

Els Aerts - Managing Partner, AGConsult

DON’T ask leading questions

Don't ask leading survey questions

A leading question is one that prompts a specific answer, and you want to avoid those because they’ll give you bad data. For example, asking ‘What makes our product better than our competitors’ products?’ might boost your self-esteem, but it won’t get you good information because you’re planting the idea that your own product is the best on the market.

DON’T ask loaded questions

Don't ask loaded survey questions

A loaded question is similar to a leading question, but it does more than just push a bias—it phrases the question such that it’s impossible to answer without confirming an underlying assumption.

A common (and subtle) form of loaded survey question would be, ‘What do you find useful about this article?’ If we haven’t first asked you whether you found the article useful at all, then we’re asking a loaded question.

Good survey question examples (by industry)

We’ve collected a list of good survey questions for e-commerce, software/Software as a Service (SaaS) companies, and publishers/bloggers. Even if you don’t use them word-for-word, this list can spark some good ideas for survey questions. 

Effective questions for e-commerce companies

Survey questions for e-commerce

Before purchase

  • What information is missing or would make your decision to buy easier?
  • What is your biggest fear or concern about purchasing this item?
  • Were you able to complete the purpose of your visit today?
  • If you did not make a purchase today, what stopped you?

After purchase

  • Was there anything about this checkout process we could improve?
  • What was your biggest fear or concern about purchasing from us?
  • What persuaded you to complete the purchase of the item(s) in your cart today?
  • If you could no longer use [product name], what’s the one thing you would miss the most?
  • What’s the one thing that nearly stopped you from buying from us?

Be sure to check out our post about setting up an e-commerce post-purchase survey in 7 steps.

Other great questions

  • Do you have any questions before you complete your purchase?
  • What other content would you like to see on this page?
  • What were the three main things that persuaded you to create an account today?
  • What nearly stopped you from creating an account today?
  • Which other options did you consider before choosing [product name]?
  • What would persuade you to use us more often?
  • What was your biggest challenge, frustration or problem in finding the right [product type] online?
  • Please list the top three things that persuaded you to use us rather than a competitor.
  • What other products would you like to see us offer?
  • Were you able to find the information you were looking for?
  • How satisfied are you with our support?
  • How would you rate our service on a scale of 0-10? (NPS question)
  • How would you rate our support on a scale of 0-10? (NPS question)
  • How likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague? (NPS question, rate 0-10)
  • Is there anything preventing you from purchasing at this point?

Effective questions for Software and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) companies

Survey questions for SaaS

New or trial users

  • What nearly stopped you from signing up today?
  • What would persuade you to use us more often?
  • How likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague on a scale of 0-10? (NPS question)
  • Is our pricing clear? If not—what would you change?

Customers

  • What convinced you to pay for this service?
  • What’s the one thing we are missing in [product type]?
  • What's one feature we can add that would make our product indispensable for you?
  • If you could no longer use [name of product], what’s the one thing you would miss the most?

Ex-customers

  • What is the main reason you're canceling your account? (please be blunt and direct)
  • If you could change just one thing in [product name], what would it be?
  • If you had a magic wand and could change anything in [product name], what would it be? We love crazy ideas!

Other awesome questions

  • What were the three main things that persuaded you to sign up today?
  • Which other options did you consider before choosing [product name]?
  • What was your biggest challenge, frustration, or problem in finding the right [product type] online?
  • Please list the top three things that persuaded you to use us rather than a competitor.
  • Do you have any questions before starting a free trial?
  • What persuaded you to start a trial?
  • Which other options did you consider before choosing [product name]?
  • What other products would you like to see us offer?
  • Was this help section useful?
  • Was this article useful?
  • How satisfied are you with our support?
  • How would you rate our service on a scale of 0-10? (NPS question)
  • How would you rate our support on a scale of 0-10? (NPS question)
  • Is there anything preventing you from upgrading at this point?
  • Is there anything preventing you from purchasing at this point?
  • Is there anything on this page that doesn't work the way you expected it to?
  • What could we change to make you want to continue using us?
  • If you did not upgrade today, what stopped you?
  • What's the next thing you think we should build? (can be multiple choice)
  • How would you feel if we discontinued this feature?
  • What's the next feature or functionality we should build?

Effective questions for publishers and bloggers

Survey questions for bloggers

Improving content

  • If you could change just one thing in [publication name], what would it be?
  • What other content would you like to see us offer?
  • How would you rate this article on a scale of 0-10? (NPS Question)
  • If you could change anything on this page, what would you have us do?
  • If you did not subscribe to [publication name] today, what was it that stopped you?

New subscriptions

  • What convinced you to pay for this [publication]?
  • What almost stopped you from subscribing?
  • What were the three main things that persuaded you to join our list today?

Cancellations

  • What is the main reason you're unsubscribing? (please be blunt and direct)

Other great questions

  • What’s the one thing we are missing in [publication name]?
  • What would persuade you to visit us more often?
  • How likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague on a scale of 0-10? (NPS question)
  • What’s missing on this page?
  • What topics would you like to see us write about next?
  • How useful was this article?
  • What could we do to make this page more useful?
  • Is there anything on this site that doesn't work the way you expected it to?
  • What's one thing we can add that would make [publication name] indispensable for you?
  • If you could no longer read [publication name], what’s the one thing you would miss the most?

10 survey use cases: what you can do with good survey questions

Effective survey questions can help improve your business in many different ways. We’ve written in detail about most of these ideas in other blog posts, and I’ve included links for each of them below.

Use case #1: to create user personas

user-persona-hotjar

A user persona is a semi-fictional character based on the people who currently use your website or product. A persona combines psychographics and demographics and reflects who they are, what they need, and what may stop them from getting it.

Examples of questions to ask:

  • Describe yourself in one sentence, e.g. ‘I am a 30-year old marketer based in Dublin who enjoys writing articles about user personas.’
  • What is your main goal for using this website/product?
  • What, if anything, is preventing you from doing it?

Further reading:

Our post about creating simple and effective user personas in 4 steps highlights some good survey questions to ask when creating a user persona.

Use case #2: to understand why your product is not selling

Few things are more frightening than stagnant sales. When the pressure is mounting, you’ve got to get to the bottom of it, and good survey questions can help you do just that.

Examples of questions to ask:

  • What made you buy the product? What challenges are you trying to solve?
  • What did you like most about the product? What did you dislike the most?
  • What nearly stopped you from buying?

Further reading:

Here’s a detailed post about the best survey questions to ask your customers when your product isn’t selling, and why they work so well.

Use case #3: to understand why people leave your website

If you want to figure out why people are leaving your website, you’ll have to ask questions.

A good format for that is an exit-intent pop-up survey, which appears when a user clicks to leave the page.

Another way is to focus on the people who did convert, but just barely—something Hotjar CEO David Darmanin considers essential for taking conversions to the next level. By focusing on customers who bought your product (but almost didn’t), you can learn how to win over another set of users who are similar to them: those who almost bought your products, but backed out in the end.

Example of questions to ask:

  • Not for you? Tell us why. (exit-intent pop-up—ask when a user leaves without buying)
  • What almost stopped you from buying? (ask after conversion)

Further reading:

HubSpot Academy increased its conversion rate by adding an exit-intent survey that asked one simple question when users left their website: “Not for you? Tell us why.”

“I spent the better half of my career focusing on the 95% who don’t convert, but it’s better to focus on the 5% who do. Get to know them really well, deliver value to them, and really wow them. That’s how you’re going to take that 5% to 10%.”

 

david-1

 

 

David Darmanin - CEO at Hotjar

Use case #4: to understand your customers’ fears and concerns

Survey questions to understand your customers' fears

Buying a new product can be scary: nobody wants to make a bad purchase. Your job is to address your prospective customers’ concerns, counter their objections, and calm their fears, which should lead to more conversions.

Examples of questions to ask:

  • What is your biggest fear or concern about purchasing this item?
  • What information is missing or would make your decision to buy easier?

Further reading:

Take a look at our no-nonsense guide to increasing conversions for a comprehensive write-up about you can discover the drivers, barriers, and hooks that lead people to converting on your website.  

Use case #5: to drive your pricing strategy

Survey questions to improve pricing

Are your products overpriced and scaring away potential buyers? Are you underpricing and leaving money on the table?

Asking the right questions will help you come up with a pricing structure that maximizes profit, but you have to be delicate about how you ask the questions. Don’t ask directly about price; otherwise, you’ll seem like you’re unsure of the value you offer. Instead, ask questions that uncover how your products serve your customers and what would inspire them to buy more.

Examples of questions to ask:

  • How do you use our product/service?
  • What would persuade you to use our product more often?
  • What’s the one thing our product is missing?

Further reading:

We wrote a series of blog posts about managing the early stage of a SaaS startup, which included a post about developing the right pricing strategy—something businesses in all sectors could benefit from.

Use case #6: to measure and understand product/market fit

Product/market fit is about understanding demand and creating a product that your customers want, need, and will actually pay money for. A combination of online survey questions and one-on-one interviews can help you figure this out.

Examples of questions to ask:

  • What's one thing we can add that would make [product name] indispensable for you?
  • If you could no longer use [product name], what’s the one thing you would miss the most?
  • If you could change just one thing in [product name], what would it be?

Further reading:

In our series of blog posts about managing the early stage of a SaaS startup, we covered a section on product/market fit, which has relevant information for all industries.

Use case #7: to choose effective testimonials

Human beings are social creatures. We’re influenced by people who are similar to us, and testimonials that explain how your product solved a problem are the ultimate form of social proof. The following survey questions can help you get some great testimonials.

Examples of questions to ask:

  • What changed for you after you got our product?
  • How does our product help you get your job done?
  • How would you feel if you couldn’t use it anymore?

Further reading:
In our post about positioning and branding your products, we cover the type of questions that help you get effective testimonials.

Use case #8: to measure customer satisfaction

It’s important to continually track your overall customer satisfaction so you can address any issues before they start to impact your brand’s reputation. You can do this with rating scale questions.

For example, at Hotjar, we ask for feedback after each customer support interaction (which is one important measure of customer satisfaction). As you can see from the screenshot below, we begin with a simple, foot-in-the-door question to encourage a response. We use the information to improve our customer support, which is strongly tied to overall customer satisfaction.

Examples of questions to ask:

  1. How would you rate the support you received? (1-5 scale)
  2. If 1-3: How could we improve?
  3. If 4-5: What did you love about the experience?

Our beginner’s guide to website feedback goes into great detail about how to measure customer service, NPS, and other important success metrics.

Use case #9: to measure word-of-mouth recommendations

Survey questions for word-of-mouth

The Net Promoter System (NPS) is a measure of how likely your customers are to recommend your products or services to their friends or colleagues. NPS is a higher bar than customer satisfaction because customers have to be really impressed with your product to recommend you.

Example of NPS questions (to be asked in the same survey):

  1. How likely are you to recommend this company to a friend or colleague? (rate 0-10)
  2. What’s the main reason for your score?
  3. What should we do to WOW you? (optional)

Pro tip: you can use our NPS calculator to crunch the numbers.

Further reading:

We created an NPS guide specifically for e-commerce companies, but it has plenty of information that will help companies in other industries as well.

Use Case #10: to redefine your messaging

How effective is your messaging? Does it speak to your clients' needs, drives, and fears? Does it speak to your strongest selling points?

Asking the right survey questions can help you figure out what marketing messages work best, so you can double down on them.

Questions to ask:

  • What attracted you to [brand or product name]?
  • Did you have any concerns before buying [product name]?
  • Since you purchased [product name], what has been the biggest benefit to you?
  • If you could describe [brand or product name] in one sentence, how would you do it?
  • What is your favorite thing about [brand or product name]?
  • How likely are you to recommend this product to a friend or colleague? (rate 0-10)

Further reading:

We talk about positioning and branding your products in a post that’s part of a series written for SaaS startups, but even if you’re not in SaaS (or you’re not a startup), you’ll still find it helpful.

“The products that are most-liked aren’t necessarily the ones you sell most of. Just because a restaurant might sell a lot of lasagna doesn’t mean their lasagna is well-liked. In fact, it might be deterring customers from ever coming back.

"By knowing which of your products is most liked, you can:

  • Design the most effective sales funnel, so your most-liked products aren’t hidden away.
  • Improve your existing products to make purchasers more likely to buy from you again."

  

Conversion Rate Experts

Frequently Asked Questions

Sample size? (sample size calculator)

A good rule of thumb is to aim for at least 100 replies that you can work with.

You can use our sample size calculator to get a more precise answer, but understand that collecting feedback is research, not experimentation. Unlike experimentation (such as A/B testing), all is not lost if you can’t get a statistically significant sample size. In fact, as little as ten replies can give you actionable information about what your users want.

How many questions should a survey have?

There’s no perfect answer to this question, but we recommend asking as few as you need to ask in order to get the information you want. Remember, you’re essentially asking someone to work for free, so be respectful of their time.

How to analyze open-ended survey questions?

A big pile of qualitative data can seem intimidating, but there are some shortcuts that make it much easier to analyze. We put together a guide for analyzing open-ended questions in 5 simple steps, which should answer all your questions.

Will sending a survey annoy my customers?

Honestly, the real danger is not collecting feedback. Without knowing what users think about your page and why they do what they do, you’ll never create a user experience that maximizes conversions. The truth is, you’re probably already doing something that bugs them more than any survey or feedback button would.

If you’re worried that adding an on-page survey might hurt your conversion rate, start small and survey just 10% of your visitors. You can stop surveying once you have enough replies.

 

Send a survey today 🔥

Grab a free Hotjar trial and set your first survey today on your website or via email to understand your customers and grow your business.

Free forever. Get started!
 ScrollCTA

***

Our sample survey questions should give you a solid starting point on your journey toward really understanding your users. Once you get some initial feedback, you can craft questions that dive deeper into their heads to uncover their most fundamental drives.

Do you have some favorite survey questions of your own? Share them in the comments, and let us know what they taught you about your users.

Join 20,000+ marketers and designers who receive our blog posts in their inbox

Louis Grenier

Content Lead at Hotjar - Louis is a major marketing geek who believes that good marketing starts with understanding people (and not tricking them).

comments powered by Disqus
Back to top